Lens Based Media Artist
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⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr (ShiftControl/CommandPower) utilizes digital technology to confront environments otherwise difficult for women to navigate. Digital media and green screens allow me to build my own atmosphere to reveal the violent nature of public space. I grant myself the right to inhabit these situations safely by inserting my nude self into the intersections of oppression I experience as a queer Latina. This performance is a critical response to my life as a woman on the streets of San Jose and a reaction to everyday sexism and rape culture. The large-scale video installation uses the backdrop of San Jose at night to confront public space, objectification, and street harassment.

In video loop, I dress myself in reverse slow motion, exploring the spectacle of garments as a mechanism to reveal and conceal. This references clothing as a tool for security and resistance against the gaze, while highlighting its ultimate inefficiency. The social construct of women as objects becomes the culprit for female insecurity. Clothing and skin are not the consequence of female vulnerability, and whether one is nude or clothed, the intrusive gaze is ever-present. The audience is made aware of this through constant eye contact in an effort to threaten thoughtless titillation and evoke confrontation. I “gaze back,” as Carrie Mae Weems calls it. I deflect objectification and envelop the viewer in a threatening environment by utilizing a robotic female voice, confrontational hashtags, and found sound. Through these acts I hope to illuminate digital performance as a form of self-preservation, empowerment and resistance.

[The digital performance is made to be looped continuously in gallery installations]

"It’s interesting that I felt you were most vulnerable to the environment once you were completely clothed." -Tatyana Fazlizadeh of Stop Telling Women To Smile

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr

Video Loop Time: 3 minutes 30 seconds.

Ctrl/Pwr (ShiftControl/CommandPower) utilizes digital technology to confront environments otherwise difficult for women to navigate. Digital media and green screens allow me to build my own atmosphere to reveal the violent nature of public space. I grant myself the right to inhabit these situations safely by inserting my nude self into the intersections of oppression I experience as a queer Latina. This performance is a critical response to my life as a woman on the streets of San Jose and a reaction to everyday sexism and rape culture. The large-scale video installation uses the backdrop of San Jose at night to confront public space, objectification, and street harassment.

In video loop, I dress myself in reverse slow motion, exploring the spectacle of garments as a mechanism to reveal and conceal. This references clothing as a tool for security and resistance against the gaze, while highlighting its ultimate inefficiency. The social construct of women as objects becomes the culprit for female insecurity. Clothing and skin are not the consequence of female vulnerability, and whether one is nude or clothed, the intrusive gaze is ever-present. The audience is made aware of this through constant eye contact in an effort to threaten thoughtless titillation and evoke confrontation. I “gaze back,” as Carrie Mae Weems calls it. I deflect objectification and envelop the viewer in a threatening environment by utilizing a robotic female voice, confrontational hashtags, and found sound. Through these acts I hope to illuminate digital performance as a form of self-preservation, empowerment and resistance.

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr (ShiftControl/CommandPower) utilizes digital technology to confront environments otherwise difficult for women to navigate. Digital media and green screens allow me to build my own atmosphere to reveal the violent nature of public space. I grant myself the right to inhabit these situations safely by inserting my nude self into the intersections of oppression I experience as a queer Latina. This performance is a critical response to my life as a woman on the streets of San Jose and a reaction to everyday sexism and rape culture. The large-scale video installation uses the backdrop of San Jose at night to confront public space, objectification, and street harassment.

In video loop, I dress myself in reverse slow motion, exploring the spectacle of garments as a mechanism to reveal and conceal. This references clothing as a tool for security and resistance against the gaze, while highlighting its ultimate inefficiency. The social construct of women as objects becomes the culprit for female insecurity. Clothing and skin are not the consequence of female vulnerability, and whether one is nude or clothed, the intrusive gaze is ever-present. The audience is made aware of this through constant eye contact in an effort to threaten thoughtless titillation and evoke confrontation. I “gaze back,” as Carrie Mae Weems calls it. I deflect objectification and envelop the viewer in a threatening environment by utilizing a robotic female voice, confrontational hashtags, and found sound. Through these acts I hope to illuminate digital performance as a form of self-preservation, empowerment and resistance.

[The digital performance is made to be looped continuously in gallery installations]

"It’s interesting that I felt you were most vulnerable to the environment once you were completely clothed." -Tatyana Fazlizadeh of Stop Telling Women To Smile

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr

Video Loop Time: 3 minutes 30 seconds.

Ctrl/Pwr (ShiftControl/CommandPower) utilizes digital technology to confront environments otherwise difficult for women to navigate. Digital media and green screens allow me to build my own atmosphere to reveal the violent nature of public space. I grant myself the right to inhabit these situations safely by inserting my nude self into the intersections of oppression I experience as a queer Latina. This performance is a critical response to my life as a woman on the streets of San Jose and a reaction to everyday sexism and rape culture. The large-scale video installation uses the backdrop of San Jose at night to confront public space, objectification, and street harassment.

In video loop, I dress myself in reverse slow motion, exploring the spectacle of garments as a mechanism to reveal and conceal. This references clothing as a tool for security and resistance against the gaze, while highlighting its ultimate inefficiency. The social construct of women as objects becomes the culprit for female insecurity. Clothing and skin are not the consequence of female vulnerability, and whether one is nude or clothed, the intrusive gaze is ever-present. The audience is made aware of this through constant eye contact in an effort to threaten thoughtless titillation and evoke confrontation. I “gaze back,” as Carrie Mae Weems calls it. I deflect objectification and envelop the viewer in a threatening environment by utilizing a robotic female voice, confrontational hashtags, and found sound. Through these acts I hope to illuminate digital performance as a form of self-preservation, empowerment and resistance.

⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr
⇧Ctrl/⌘Pwr